The ways in which we “come out” — or DON’T — say a lot about who we are and how we are perceived.

Coming out can expose shame as much as it can reveal open-minded acceptance. Stories about the reactions from our family and friends, or the ways in which we guard our decisions through alias and discretion can present an honest look at what it’s like to work in the field of sexuality, especially within an industry so often misrepresented. While some denounce pornography as obscene, and others praise its associates brazen liberation, the actual accounts of what happens when we live with our choices off the set walk the line and offer a refreshingly honest look at the complexity of sexuality. I want to hear your story.

I’m seeking submissions of personal narratives from porn performers, videographers, photographers, producers, directors, web producers, industry writers and reviewers, and anyone else who works in the field of pornography. Posts by family members of porn people, parents, children, siblings or even lovers will also be considered.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

  • Write about your experience coming out (or not) and whatever details you’d like to share.
  • Pen names/pseudonym or changing the names of people in your story are accepted.
  • There is no word-count requirement, though anywhere between 1,000 and 4,000 is preferred. (All lengths considered.)
  • Please send as a Word, Text, or Google Doc, or in the body of the email.
  • If your work is selected, I will contact you in regards to publishing information, payment, and contracts.
  • Writers retain rights and may publish their work at any time, as they see fit. Exclusivity is not required.
  • Multiple submissions will be accepted.
  • DEADLINE: December 1st, 2014

Email: Jiz@JizLee.com
Accepted entries will be compensated $50-100.

So, what was your experience like? What information do you withhold? Do you generalize what you do when asked? Are you more open to disclosing your job to close friends, or to complete strangers? Do your children know about your work? Do their teachers know? Do you have any advice to share with others? Did you find acceptance and excitement about coming out? Did it surprise you to find support? Did it disgust you to find the people you love place judgement on you? Did you have to educate or defend yourself or others? Did you withhold information or details? Is there a component about coming out that felt freeing? Is coming out necessary? I’m looking forward to your submissions.

And I have to say: thank you everyone, for the support you’ve given to me through your emails and messages, for purchasing my work, for respecting my gender pronouns and sexuality, for inspiring me to write and share my experiences, and more. I will also have a story in the book, and I’m looking forward to hearing from you!